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Long Loch Torpedo Range, Scotland
       
     
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Long Loch Torpedo Range, Scotland
       
     
Long Loch Torpedo Range, Scotland

Nestled on the northern shore of Long Loch in Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park resides the crumbling remains of a torpedo testing station. It was in operation from 1912 to 1986 and played a major role in WWII weapons testing, with over 12,000 torpedos fired down the Loch in 1944. 

Since being decomissioned, the site has become a popular hangout for local fisherman and the stage for various Loch-side raves of epic proportions. Some colourful artwork from these parties can still be seen on the walls today. 

However, the party is now officially over with plans to transform the site into a £70million five-star resort recently welcomed by local authorities. Proposals for the Ben Arther resort, which takes its name from the tallest mountain in the area, can be found here

I plan to document the development of the old torpedo station over the next few years in order to ascertain its affects upon the local area. Current local opinion seems to be very positive. 

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